Blog

Keep up with the latest news!

Hearing Loss in the Workplace

Hearing Loss in the Workplace

Posted by NJAdmin on Oct 19, 2017

Overview

With 10,000 baby boomers turning 65 daily, the number of seniors in the U.S. has grown substantially over the last 20 years. Yet, hearing loss, often a product of the aging process, is now more and more frequently caused by environmental factors, like noise.

Add to this job-related hearing loss due to the nature of the work in specific industries, and hearing loss is occurring more frequently in the workplace. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control estimate that 22 million Americans are exposed to hazardous noise levels at work. But, even the quietest workplace can be noisy as more and more employees work with music piped through earbuds, another hearing loss contributor.

How hearing loss impacts employees varies depending on the employee’s role within the organization and the industry that company serves. People in customer facing roles, and those that rely heavily on phone use such as call center representative or inside sales, will experience hearing loss differently than might a warehouse worker, for example.

Yet, nearly all employees with hearing loss can find themselves feeling isolated from their coworkers, and participation in company meetings and events can be difficult. Many report that their hearing loss limits professional growth opportunities.

Broad Occurrence

This often leads to denial and fear, which stops many workers from disclosing their hearing loss to supervisors. This lack of reporting means hearing loss in the workplace is likely much more common than you might expect.

This is a shame for everyone, as unaccommodated hearing loss has a genuine cost to employees, but also to their employers. Staff retention, productivity and employee satisfaction are all commonly impacted when employees have hearing loss.  For example, a valuable employee who is beginning to experience progressive hearing loss may choose to exit the company if they feel unable to properly perform their job functions, or if they are unable to use traditional communication tools provided by the company. With this exit comes a loss of knowledge and skills for the employer, both of which are difficult and expensive to replace.

Addressing Issues

Effectively addressing hearing loss in the workplace requires a comprehensive solution that includes both employers and employees. Employee wellness programs can play an important role, as well as education campaigns with employees, which focus not only on available accommodations, but also recognizing the early signs of hearing loss. Paired with equipment and services that provide proper workplace accommodation, these programs greatly increase the likelihood of success and benefit both the employee and the company.

Lead the Change

Consider discussing your company’s approach to accommodating employees with hearing loss with your HR department. Whether initiated by you or your HR department, there is value in coordinating employee education events to help others around you who may be at the beginning stages of hearing loss and are either unaware of its impact, or that there are accommodations available to assist them in the workplace.

In addition, assistive technology is constantly evolving. Make certain your company has processes in place to continue to research and evaluate the latest technology and how it can positively impact those at your company.

These days, hearing loss in the workplace should not drive workers out of the workforce, limit advancement opportunities, or impact an employee’s productivity. Help take the lead at your workplace to make certain every employee maintains equal access.

Additional Resources

HLAA has assembled an Employment Toolkit for those with hearing loss:

http://www.hearingloss.org/content/workplace

Hear-it has assembled several ideas to help those with hearing loss function effectively at work:

http://bit.ly/2wJK8qG

This CDC article has specifics on how best to prevent hearing loss in the workplace:

http://bit.ly/2zb36I7

Healthy Hearing provides ideas for both employees and employers in this informative article:

http://bit.ly/2xta26o

What are your experiences with hearing loss in the workplace and programs available to you through your employer? Share your stories in the comments below.

Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids: An Overview

Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids: An Overview

Posted by NJAdmin on Sep 20, 2017

Overview

If you’re one of the many Americans for whom hearing aids serve a vital role in your day-to-day life, there are some significant changes coming to the hearing aid industry which might affect you. People choose a hearing aid for many reasons, most of which boil down to seeking better connections with friends and family, and ensuring those connections continue after they begin to lose their ability to hear.

In the past, the FDA has closely regulated hearing aids, required their purchase and fitting to occur only through a licensed hearing health care professional. However, recent legislation working its way through congress may change that. If the Over the Counter Hearing Aid Act becomes law, it will, for the first time, allow the sale of hearing aids over the counter (OTC), completely without the input of a hearing healthcare professional.

While some devices such as these have been in the marketplace for years, they’ve been required to be called “personal sound amplifiers” vs. hearing aids. While the two function similarly at the most basic level – they both amplify sound for the wearer – a true “hearing aid” could only be obtained through an audiologist or hearing aid fitter.

If signed into law, the new legislation will allow these devices to be called “hearing aids” and to be sold without prescription or consultation of any kind.

Legislation Status

So how soon can you expect this change? There are a few hurdles to cross before you can buy your hearing aids with your cold medicine. In early August, the Senate passed the legislation that paves the way for making over the counter hearing aids a reality. Under the proposed legislation, the FDA will have three years to create a new regulatory category for these products, and to set up the appropriate regulations to ensure appropriate product labeling, and that the products themselves meet specific safety, consumer and manufacturing standards.

As you might expect, there are many in favor and against the legislation, with both groups offering valid points.

Pros

Advocates of OTC hearing aids include the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA), the nation’s largest organization for people with hearing loss. HLAA believes that lower cost hearing aid alternatives will significantly broaden access to a critical hearing health product previously unavailable to many who either can’t afford or are unwilling to pay the cost of traditional hearing aids.

HLAA believes this change may accelerate hearing aid adoption of hearing aids by those who are newly experiencing hearing loss. With the average person waiting 7-10 years between when they first need a hearing aid and when they get one, HLAA reasons people with a new hearing loss will have a much better change at maintaining social and familial connections in the earliest stages of their hearing loss.

Cons

This legislation is also supported by those providing hearing health care, albeit with some important caveats. For example, both the American Academy of Audiology and the Academy of Doctors of Audiology, want to ensure all OTC hearing aids are clearly labeled for use by only those with mild hearing loss. They reason that as hearing loss becomes greater, the complexity of the hearing instruments and the need for them to be tuned to the needs of a particular wearer become much more important.

These groups also want to ensure that OTC instruments are only authorized for use by those over the age of 18, and that they carry stringent guidelines on how the devices work. This is important to ensure that any device that amplifies sound doesn’t inadvertently contribute to increased hearing loss.

These organizations and the hearing aid manufacturers themselves agree that the best patient outcomes come from a combination of a consultation with a hearing health care professional and a hearing aid tuned to the needs of that specific patient. Without both, these groups worry that poor outcomes from an OTC hearing aid may discourage users from seeing a hearing health care professional in the future, thereby making the situation worse.

Summary

As you consider options for you or a loved one, keep an eye on this legislation and the regulations as they develop. And whichever direction you’re considering, be sure that you explore all of your options fully, consult a knowledgeable source and select the device that is right for your specific situation. 


Additional Resources

Hearing Loss Association of America’s statement on OTC hearing aids.

A study by AARP comparing traditional hearing aids and the OTC variety.

Information on the legislation working towards becoming law.

American Academy of Audiology’s statement on OTC hearing aids.

Academy of Doctors of Audiology’s statement on OTC hearing aids.

Caring for an Aging Family Member

Caring for an Aging Family Member

Posted by NJAdmin on Aug 24, 2017

As summer ends, many families are preparing their households to get back to school. From returning to an earlier bedtime a week or two in advance to buying the seemingly larger-every-year list of school supplies, most of those preparations are centered on getting back to a more familiar and structured schedule.

However, for an ever-increasing number of families, preparation also includes caring for an aging family member. Unlike previous generations that chose to move to retirement communities or senior care facilities, the baby boom generation and their kids and grandkids are more frequently choosing to remain in their own homes during retirement—generally referred to as “aging in place.”

This has placed more families into the role as caregiver for their parents and loved ones. Fortunately, there are more resources and technology available to improve this experience for all involved.

Why aging in place?

The reasons people choose to age in place are as varied as the personalities of people themselves. Sentimentality often tops the list, while others want to retain a sense of independence. Cost plays a major role for virtually everyone. Whatever the reason, studies have shown that those who age in place are healthier and more active than their counterparts who choose a residential facility.

One of the most significant benefits of aging in place is the sense of connection that comes from continuing to participate in existing social circles and the satisfaction that stems from maintaining a home. Even light housework and yard work – viewed as a burden in the past – can encourage people to get up and move throughout the day.

Most importantly, staying in familiar settings and close to loved ones allows for a familiar routine and comfort.

Available Resources

While the benefits to the retired person are many, aging in place almost always requires assistance from others in the family to care for their loved one. Excellent resources are available for families who wish to help a loved one age in place. These resources can provide guidance on health care and financial matters as well as in providing you information on how best to keep you and your other family members healthy, and to manage your home throughout this process.

Caring.com, for example, is a leading online information source for home and assisted care. The organization provides many ideas on how best to share the workload within the family, how to avoid conflict through use of regular family meetings, and how to positively resolve conflicts.

Another resource – Nolo.com – offers legal advice for common elder-focused issues such as estate planning and financial matters including social security and health insurance.

Technology Support

As it has in every area of our lives, technology has made aging in place and caregiving significantly easier in recent years.

For example, several companies offer senior-friendly computers with specialized functionality to monitor activity, provide medicine reminders and even provide health assessments by connecting with health devices.  Video calling using Skype or Facetime makes it simple to connect with loved ones virtually face to face and allow for a regular visual check up on their health and mental state.

Finally, to maintain long-established connections with friends, captioned telephone services such as New Jersey CapTel provide a familiar, easy way to connect over the telephone, with the added convenience of captions to assist with hearing loss.

Keeping the Caregiver Healthy

As you work to balance the needs of your own household and that of your parent, don’t forget to take time to keep yourself emotionally and physically well. This is essential to effectively care for your loved one.

Remember that over time, the amount of work needed by your loved one will likely increase. You may find yourself helping with chores they used to do completely on their own, as well as assisting more often with healthcare administration and decisions. This could range from simply making sure they take their daily medications on time to providing some form of personal hygiene care or limited physical therapy. Keeping yourself mentally and physically healthy will be key for all involved.

Caring for an aging family can be rewarding for everyone. It can help to strengthen bonds and create shared memories as well as give your loved one a more comfortable path to a longer-term care facility. Make sure you plan and communicate, keep an eye out for additional resources to help. Most important, take good care of yourself.

Additional resources that may be of interest:

Where to begin
A good article on legal and financial considerations to consider
http://bit.ly/2wxqIpp

What you should know
A good starting point for items to consider when providing care
http://cnn.it/2vmshI4

Caring for older relatives
Where to find practical and emotional support
http://bit.ly/2uJy1b7

Personal Care Agreements
Compensating a family member for providing care
http://bit.ly/2vSfgay

Technology
Top 10 technology devices for seniors
http://bit.ly/2wLBCqx

Family Conflict
How to avoid and handle family conflicts when caring for an elderly relative
http://bit.ly/2usrkz3

Information for siblings
Good advice when there are several adult children in the mix
http://to.pbs.org/2wxqPBl

Your mental health
A list of ideas to help you maintain your mental health through this process
http://bit.ly/2vSq084


What are your experiences serving as a long-term caregiver for a loved one? Share your tips in the comments below!

Get Looped In

Get Looped In

Posted by NJAdmin on Mar 01, 2017

One of life’s great joys is attending a live play or concert. Whether a professional performance on par with Broadway or a high school play starring your grandchild in a featured role, the arts can raise the spirit and bring the community together. However, if you’ve recently been to a live performance, you likely understand how hearing loss can interfere with this experience. Unlike seeing the latest movie at a theater where captions are available, catching all the dialog or lyrics at a play or concert can prove difficult.

For those proficient in sign language, many venues provide interpreters for events. But if that is not an option for you, perhaps your hearing aid is equipped with a T-coil that could make all the difference.

T-coil, you ask? The telecoil (or “T-Coil”) is currently available on 85% of all hearing instruments, and can be used in conjunction with a “loop.”  “Loops,”—also called inductive loops—are an accommodation many live performance venues – as well as hospitals, boarding counters at airports, libraries, and other public locations – install so people with hearing loss can have the best possible experience while using the facility. If your performance theater has a loop, activating your T-coil will allow you to have the dialog piped directly to your hearing instrument.

Proven Technology

Loops have been available for nearly 25 years and still offer the best possible experience for hearing in a live environment. A loop is just a metal loop of wire that encircles the floor of a specific area – whether it’s a theater, for example, or even space around a ticket counter. Microphones installed in the area are connected to this loop. They could be mics on a performer, or a gate agent’s lapel mic at the airport. When that person speaks into the microphone, his or her words flow to the loop. The loop broadcasts the sound through a magnetic field, accessed by anyone with an activated T-coil on their hearing instrument.

Richard Einhorne, a Grammy award winning composer, described the profound impact of the experience.

“There I was, at ‘Wicked’, weeping uncontrollably and I don’t even like musicals,” Einhorne told The New York Times. “For the first time since I lost my hearing, live music was perfectly clear, perfectly clean, and incredibly rich.”

Loops have been widely adopted in Northern Europe, and thanks to the efforts of many fans, and advocacy groups like HLAA and ASHA, they are available more and more in the U.S. In fact, a website called loopfinder.com, and its companion iPhone app, makes it easy to search for performance locations with loops installed and available for use.

What about Bluetooth?

Given Bluetooth’s prevalence in hearing aids, people often ask if Bluetooth technology may one day replace loops. It’s a fair question.

Bluetooth is really a complementary technology to loops. Sound transmitted through the loop is clearer, and free of distortion because it’s a direct, electromagnetic connection to the user, and leverages the user’s personal hearing instrument tuning.

In contrast, Bluetooth is most effective for personal electronics, such as TVs, captioned telephones, and music players. It tends to drain the hearing instrument battery much more quickly than does the T-coil, and is greatly reliant on the user being close (usually within 30 feet) of the transmitter. Sitting beyond that distance can introduce interference and noise.

The best news is that loops are not only great for the user, but they’re relatively inexpensive for a venue to install, and can be installed just about anywhere. Many banks, car rental desks, and theaters have loops, and some people even have them installed in their homes in the TV room. And, unlike the special headphones you may have tried at a venue, using your own hearing aid’s T-coil is discreet; you just turn it on, and no one is the wiser! Just make certain your audiologist has tuned your hearing aid’s T-coil prior to use.

If you’ve used loops before, how did they work out for you? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page!

~~~~~

Loops lend your hearing a helping hand in venues of all sizes. In the same way, New Jersey CapTel gives your hearing a helping hand on the phone, displaying live captions of your phone conversation so you can hear and read your calls. More information here or visit us on Facebook.

And the Winner for Best (Captioned) Picture is…

And the Winner for Best (Captioned) Picture is…

Posted by NJAdmin on Feb 13, 2017

With Oscar Season nearly upon us, many of the nation’s movie fans make their way to theaters to see the nominated films before the awards are presented. For those with hearing loss, a trip to the movies has long been an exercise in frustration. Finding a theater that offers captions, let alone the actual film you want to see with captions, has been challenging.

Fortunately things are changing, and the answer no longer has to be “wait until it comes out on DVD or Netflix.” While both offer “easy on” captions, neither matches the experience of seeing your favorite films on the big screen.

During all the turkey consumption last November, you may have missed a recent rule finalized by then Attorney General Lynch. The rule, which went in to effect on December 2nd, requires theaters offering movies using digital technology to proactively offer captioned film options for people with hearing loss. Fortunately, this includes nearly 97% of the nation’s theaters.

What do these captions look like? Well, if you’ve been to an open captioned film in the past ­— one which displays captions of both the dialog and sound effects (such as a door slamming or a phone ringing) — the new technology is similar, but decidedly different.

Theaters have long sought a balance between accommodating people with hearing loss, and avoiding the distraction of captions for their other patrons. The earliest attempt was a technology called Rear Window Captioning, sponsored by WGBH in Boston. This projected the captions on the back of the theater, reversed, and provided a mirror-like device at each seat which the patron could position so the captions would be reflected on the device.

It was a great idea but wrought with challenges, not the least of which was broken equipment and a limited number of theaters that had installed the expensive solution.

Today, digital films enable captions to be projected using infrared light, generally invisible, except for hard of hearing patrons through a set of special glasses each theater has on hand. When it’s working, the technology seemingly strikes the right balance, giving hard of hearing viewers a rich, captioned experience, while providing other patrons a caption-free show.

As with any technology, this one does have its growing pains. Many complain that the glasses are bulky and uncomfortable to wear through an entire feature length film. By far the biggest complaint is that theaters frequently forget to charge the glasses, leaving movie fans back where they started. While some theater owners may seem indifferent to the frustration, many more recognize the huge opportunity to reach new viewers in an environment where box office proceeds are at their lowest in decades.

Finding films offering captions has gotten a lot easier. While standalone sites still exist (like Caption Fish, for example), the biggest listings include details on listening devices. Fandango, for example, includes an “Amenities” link for each theater. Just look for “listening devices” included in the amenities list. It might be a good idea too to call ahead to make sure someone puts the glasses on a charger. Let us know how it goes!

What has been your experience with using captions at the movies? Have any Oscar predictions? Leave a post on our Facebook page.

~~~

If you like captions on your movies, you’ll LOVE captions on your phone calls. Check out the many free captioned telephone options available to New Jersey residents. Visit: http://njcaptel.com.

Enriching Holiday Calls with Family

Enriching Holiday Calls with Family

Posted by NJAdmin on Dec 15, 2016

As we close out 2016, families across the country are connecting for the holidays and we have more ways to stay in touch than ever before. Whether using some form of text, social media, online video chat, or the good “old fashioned” telephone, the choices for connecting over the holiday season seem endless.

Read more
The Hearing Loss Guide to Thanksgiving

The Hearing Loss Guide to Thanksgiving

Posted by NJAdmin on Nov 17, 2016

As the start of the holiday season, Thanksgiving is a common time for families to get together to catch up. Beyond outsized personalities and relationships, Thanksgiving can bring its own, unique stress if you’re adjusting to hearing loss. “Do I want to tell everyone in the family?” “Will I be able to hear well enough to catch up with everyone?” “Will I miss things or be left out of conversations?” are all questions considered by many people, not just you.

Family get-togethers can be loud, with large groups of talkers and distracting noise from TV football games and parades in the background. And, while hearing loss can make such a boisterous environment even more challenging, there are practical ways you can catch up and enjoy the conversation.

Read more
The “Trick” of Hearing Protection Is a Communication “Treat”

The “Trick” of Hearing Protection Is a Communication “Treat”

Posted by NJAdmin on Oct 18, 2016

While October conjures images of pumpkins and kids in costumes excited for Halloween, the month’s lesser-known honor is “National Protect Your Hearing Month.” Together with the American Academy of Audiology, the National Institute of Health gives this title to October as a way to raise the nation’s awareness of noise-induced hearing loss and methods to prevent it.

Read more
4 Resources for New Jersey Residents with Hearing Loss

4 Resources for New Jersey Residents with Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on Sep 08, 2016

When it comes to having hearing loss in New Jersey, what are your options? It turns out there are several resources available to you not that far away.

Check out some of the services you can take advantage of in the Garden State.

Read more
Can Treating My Hearing Loss Help Me Stay Active?

Can Treating My Hearing Loss Help Me Stay Active?

Posted by NJAdmin on Jun 21, 2016

When you’ve experienced hearing loss in some way, shape or form in your life, it can be easy to retreat and avoid activity. But thanks to hugely beneficial treatments, such as hearing aids and assistive listening devices (ALDs), there are loads of benefits to improving your abilities to stay active.

Read more
5 Jobs That Affect Your Hearing Health

5 Jobs That Affect Your Hearing Health

Posted by NJAdmin on Jun 14, 2016

Not everyone can be a librarian – some jobs require a little more exposure to high-decibel sound on a regular basis. But which positions are the most potentially damaging for their jobholders?

Check out some of the jobs that can have a negative effect on your hearing below.

Read more
Working Through the Job Search with Hearing Loss

Working Through the Job Search with Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on Jun 10, 2016

The job search can get stressful – from tracking down the right positions to sending out résumés to landing those important interviews, it’s no cakewalk.

But when you have hearing loss, the search can add even more steps to the process – try out these best practices while you seek out your dream career.

Read more
6 Famous People with Hearing Loss

6 Famous People with Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on Jun 02, 2016

Whether you know them or not, there are inspirational, well-known people out there who have experienced hearing loss in one way or another. Check out some of these relatable instances of famous individuals with hearing loss.

Read more
5 Common Myths About Hearing Loss

5 Common Myths About Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on May 17, 2016

You can’t always believe what you’re told when it comes to hearing loss. There are several common misconceptions about hearing loss that are just plain untrue.

Some of those myths are outlined below – did you know that these weren’t entirely true?

Read more
3 Helpful Technologies for Individuals with Hearing Loss

3 Helpful Technologies for Individuals with Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on May 10, 2016

Conversation is key to much of what you do on a daily basis. If you are hard of hearing, there have been technological advances that can assist you with these day-to-day interactions.

Below are three technologies that could change your conversational experiences.

Read more
Confidence and Hearing Loss: Taking Control of the Conversation

Confidence and Hearing Loss: Taking Control of the Conversation

Posted by NJAdmin on May 03, 2016

When it comes to living with hearing loss, it’s easy to become defeated when it comes to conversations and listening in public. But with the right amount of confidence, you can take control of your hearing loss and enjoy the things you love.

Try these tips on for size the next time you’re hesitant to do something you enjoy.

Read more
Hearing Loss and Your Teen: Tips for Avoiding Impairment

Hearing Loss and Your Teen: Tips for Avoiding Impairment

Posted by NJAdmin on Apr 27, 2016

Think about the amount of noise you’re exposed to every day. From high-decibel noise at your place of work to chores such as vacuuming or lawn-mowing that create a high volume of sound, potentially damaging noise is rampant.

When it comes to the teenagers in your household, though, there’s often a heightened risk of exposure to high-level noise. Remember the following when assessing your teen’s hearing.

Read more
Handling Noise and Hearing Loss at Work

Handling Noise and Hearing Loss at Work

Posted by NJAdmin on Apr 19, 2016

Everyone experiences a little bit of background noise in his or her workplace. But when if you are experiencing hearing loss, noise levels and proper accommodations can make or break your employment experience.

Whether disruptive noise is affecting your work or you need advice for finding a job that can accommodate your hearing loss, here are a few tips.

Read more
Finding the Perfect CapTel Phone for Low-Vision Users

Finding the Perfect CapTel Phone for Low-Vision Users

Posted by NJAdmin on Apr 06, 2016

Captioned telephone services are great for hard-of-hearing. But what if you also struggle to see your captioned conversations?

If text size is a concern when it comes to deciphering captions and you need a little more magnification when you’re reading, the CapTel 880i low-vision phone is the perfect choice.

It’s your captions, more readable than ever.

Read more
College Bound: Tips for Hard-of-Hearing Students

College Bound: Tips for Hard-of-Hearing Students

Posted by NJAdmin on Mar 29, 2016

Once you retrieve your high school diploma, what’s next? The college-planning process for a hard-of-hearing person doesn’t need to be a huge hassle. In fact, there are a variety of options available to you in the college and university systems.

Keep the following in mind when you begin your hunt for the ideal school.

Read more
Why Treating Your Hearing Loss is Important for Your Emotional Health

Why Treating Your Hearing Loss is Important for Your Emotional Health

Posted by NJAdmin on Mar 22, 2016

There’s more than one way to treat your hearing loss – and it’s incredibly important to do so. Your hearing loss can affect more than just your general communication abilities. It can affect you emotionally in ways you might not expect if you let it go untreated.

Keep these effects in mind and take steps to treat your hearing loss – your emotional state will improve greatly with each step you take!

Read more
How to Protect Yourself from Hearing Loss

How to Protect Yourself from Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on Mar 15, 2016

In your daily life, you use your hearing in most situations. Whether you have full hearing functionality or a hearing impairment, protecting your abilities is highly important.

There are plenty of measures you can take to do this that don’t cost an arm and a leg and are simple adjustments to your everyday activities and tendencies. (Plus, they’ll have long-term effects that will keep your hearing healthy.)

Read on for a few tips.

Read more
4 Ways to Reduce Stress When Living with Hearing Loss

4 Ways to Reduce Stress When Living with Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on Mar 11, 2016

Speaking with and listening to others can often be a struggle when you’ve experienced hearing loss. And this difficulty can have adverse effects on stress levels – be they yours or the person with whom you’re speaking.

But there are simple ways for you to reduce your stress and the stress of those around you. Try these tips on for size.

Read more
Product Profile: CapTel 2400i

Product Profile: CapTel 2400i

Posted by NJAdmin on Mar 08, 2016

With the right type of phone technology, you can keep your communication experience right at your fingertips.

If you’re seeking convenience in your phone service and you’re familiar with your tablet and smartphone, the touch-screen CapTel 2400i phone will be a comfortable fit for you.

(Plus, for a limited time only, enjoy free shipping on the CapTel 2400i – see details below.)

Read more
Treat Your Hearing Aids Right: Accessories and Tools You Can Use

Treat Your Hearing Aids Right: Accessories and Tools You Can Use

Posted by NJAdmin on Feb 23, 2016

Your hearing aids become a part of you – you use them on a daily basis and they’re pivotal to your understanding and communication. So it’s key that you take proper care of them and make use of them to their utmost potential to get the most of out of your hearing aids.

Read more
Get to Know Assistive Listening Devices

Get to Know Assistive Listening Devices

Posted by NJAdmin on Feb 09, 2016

Your everyday life just got a lot easier – when you’re hearing impaired or hard of hearing there are a variety of options available to you to make listening easier. Assistive listening devices (ALDs) are made to help aid you in hearing and comprehension of conversation.

Read more
8 Tips for Speaking to People with Hearing Loss

8 Tips for Speaking to People with Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on Jan 26, 2016

Communicating with a friend or family member dealing with hearing loss can be difficult, so it helps to know some ways in which you can make the situation a little easier. Keep in mind the following tips the next time you’re communicating with someone who is hearing impaired.

Read more
How to Benefit from Relay Conference Captioning

How to Benefit from Relay Conference Captioning

Posted by NJAdmin on Jan 19, 2016

There’s one more perk to being a resident in New Jersey – you have free access to Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) services for your face-to-face meetings, classrooms and teleconference calls.

Read more
Hearing Loss: How to Improve Your Daily Life

Hearing Loss: How to Improve Your Daily Life

Posted by NJAdmin on Jan 12, 2016

Hearing loss can be a difficult development with which to deal, so it’s important to know the best ways in which you can live life to the fullest, no matter your level of loss. There are tools at your disposal to make everyday life more fulfilling – here are just a few of them:

Read more
The Three Types of Hearing Loss

The Three Types of Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on Jan 07, 2016

There are many different contributing factors to hearing loss, but it’s generally agreed that there are three types of hearing loss. Designating which type is affecting you or your loved one depends on the location of the damage.

Read more
Hearing Loss: What You Can Do to Help

Hearing Loss: What You Can Do to Help

Posted by NJAdmin on Oct 13, 2015

Dealing with the onset of hearing loss can be difficult, so it’s important to educate your friends and family to develop a positive support system. Once you’ve done your due diligence and been seen by a professional, such as an otolaryngologist or audiologist, make sure you’re aware of the ways in which you can ease the process for those around you.

Read more
Who is New Jersey CapTel?

Who is New Jersey CapTel?

Posted by NJAdmin on Sep 11, 2015

First and foremost, New Jersey CapTel is a service provider, founded in April 2006. Our goal is to offer the irreplaceable gifts of confidence, independence and communication to people with hearing loss. 

Read more
7 Factors in Recognizing Hearing Loss

7 Factors in Recognizing Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on Sep 11, 2015

Detecting hearing loss in yourself or others, including friends and family members, can be a difficult task. It can be a gradual change, and it’s not always very obvious to those experiencing hearing loss or the people around them. The following are a few key points to keep in mind.

Read more
Knowing the Causes of Hearing Loss

Knowing the Causes of Hearing Loss

Posted by NJAdmin on Sep 11, 2015

There are a great deal of contributing factors when it comes to hearing loss, some more common than others. But it’s important to be aware of the triggers that may spur damage or rupture.

Read more